Massachusetts General Hospital

"The Croes~Oliva Group helped us develop clinical and administrative frameworks to more effectively manage our patients – from the first phone call, through the exam, to checkout. We will not jeopardize our vision for premier service, unparalleled quality and cost-effective treatment. The Croes~Oliva Group gave us workable plans to help us redesign operations and create a work environment that honors our physicians' multiple obligations."
 
Sally Iles, Associate Vice President of Medicine and Primary Care Services
Massachusetts General Hospital
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Administrators asked The Croes~Oliva Group to identify opportunities to improve practice operations, with an emphasis on changes that could improve work-lives for physicians and other staff in the practices.

The Croes~Oliva Group Contribution at Massachusetts General Hospital

Working with practice administrators and physician leaders at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), The Croes~Oliva Group tackled practice-specific challenges, for instance:

  • Reconfigured every operational element – from patient care coordination, to scheduling, to ancillary test management – in a practice bruised by high turnover, contract loss, and leadership changes, as it transitioned from a private to an MGH-owned primary care group
  • Promoted organizational alignment and engagement to be sure all leaders – in the front office or on the front lines – worked together to improve the care delivery process
  • Revamped organizational structure, responsibilities and staffing to optimize efficient, effective care quality, and boost financial performance
  • Resolved excessive scheduling backlogs and constrained same-day access by reengineering aspects of the care delivery process: revising scheduling and triage management procedures; reallocating staff and redefining roles; and improving utilization of available software for an on-campus teaching practice
  • Set protocols for managing patient care information for a pediatric practice mired in paperwork, determining what information needed to be prioritized, captured and stored, and for how long